Mission Statement

This website documents one man's quest to cure his MS through determination, perseverance and a little luck.

Although harsh drugs and strict diet were successfully supressing my devestating MS relapses, disease progression was quickly deteriorating my ability to walk and slowly deteriorating my ability to think. The logical solution for me was to try HSCT, which is not FDA approved, so I left the country to do it. This website documents my research and journey to effect a cure.

Time Since Transplant



1136 Days

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Recovery Blog

I recently filmed a lecture for the local MS group. The MS genius, Dr. Timothy West, gave a fantastic 30,000 ft view of the world of multiple sclerosis from his point of view as a practicing clinician. He covered all the new technologies, current treatments, and the myriad of choices he must make in treating patients.

Someone in the audience asked, "what about stem cell replacement?" There were two interesting parts to Dr. West's answer.

First, he said that a patient's own assessment of his illnesses is much worse than how a doctor perceives it. That sounds plausible to me, almost to a frustrating level.

Second, he said that doctors practicing western medicine have an obligation to the Hippocratic Oath, which basically states, "first do no harm." According to societal norms, it's better for a doctor to do nothing and watch his patient slowly die than to intervene with a powerful drug and accidentally kill the patient. This is true even if the drug has a good chance of curing the patient and potentially saving his life. Doctors don't have the option of risking life if there's a less dangerous way. Think about the liability here.

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Below is a summary of my MS pain/medication experience and management. For those of you who have been following me, you know that pain is my most significant symptom. For the first five years of my MS progression, it was strong and increasing, which is why I was constantly increasing the medication dosage and always looking for something better. You should also know that I have had painful problems with my C-spine, independent of the MS, including a C-spine surgery in year five (and a misdiagnosed L-spine surgery in year two).

As one doctor from Stanford said, anticonvulsants have strong side effects. However, we use a cocktail of two (or more) of them, so we can get the additive benefits with less than additive side effects. Gabapentin (e.g. Neurontin or Gralise) and Pregabalin (Lyrica) are both gabapentinoids, which makes them easy to transition between. Those and Carbamazepine (Tegretol) are all anticonvulsants.

Early MS (1-2 years), increasing pain:

The Medical Cannabis Primer

Tomorrow morning, I go in for my last re-vaccination. It's the second monthly booster for measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR). This will complete my recovery and complete the stem cell transplant procedure.

The schedule called for the MMR to take place at +24 months, but I fell behind. For god's sake, who gets measles anymore? Well, never, except for the outbreak going on right now. As soon as I heard about it last month, I got off my ass and took care of business. I surely don't want to be infected with that.

So am I cured? Hardly. This is my personal experience. I think I stopped the MS. But it sure did a lot of damage while it was active. I think the word, "cure" implies a complete halting of the malady AND a complete reversal of the damage/symptoms it creates. Have people been completely cured of MS through HSCT? Yes, there are a few lucky souls. As for me, knowing what I now know, would I go back and do it again? Yes. In a heartbeat.

While HSCT is not for everyone with MS, for many of us, it's still the best option. Consider that I have been off of all DMTs now for almost two years. My brain and C-spine MRIs show no evidence of progression; although, they show no evidence of lesion retraction, either. I've been working out regularly at a gym with a trainer, and that has strengthened me to the point that I don't fall anymore. But my walking still sucks. Maybe that will be the job of the next miracle procedure. I hear they're getting good results with mesenchymal stem cell transplants (MSCT) in Panama...

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Merry Christmas, everyone.

"Treatment with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (aHSCT) led to a sustained decrease in disability and almost no clinical relapses in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who had failed to respond to prior immunosuppressive therapies."

These are the latest results from an Australian Phase 2 trial. This is clearly consistent with my own results. I can easily imagine HSCT available in the U.S. in just a few more years.

Here on the home front, things are still improving regularly. The swapping out of my Gralise (gabapentin) for Lyrica CR (pregabalin) has really turned into a great move.

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Today, I got the best news since I got my stem cells back.

It has now been 18 months since my last infusion of rituximab, which was my final "chemo" follow-up from the stem cell procedure. (My MS neuro considers that a DMT.) It has been almost 30 months since I got my stem cells back.

Yesterday, I had a brain MRI, the first one in a year. Today I got the results:

"No new significant abnormality seen to suggest progression."

 I've been DMT-free for 18 months without any flare-ups or progression!

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